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“It’s not happiness that makes us grateful but gratefulness that makes us happy.” – Br. David Steindl Rast

Hara: A Return To Center

Hara: A Return To Center

Trust Your Life: An Embodied Writing Retreat

 5 Thursdays Feb 23-March 23   7:15-8:30pm

Cost $160 click here 

At Mindful Yoga Collective

223 s 700 e #4

Class size is limited, so register early if you would like a spot.

When consciousness floods the deep within our core, we find there a stillness that is not self-achieved or peculiar to us or possessed by us; that eternal stillness abides there because it belongs to the nature of the world to which we belong.

-Philip Shepherd

 

In this course, we will explore a series of unique movement lessons that will help us to learn to fully inhabit, as well as to free the dynamic movement potential of  the lower abdomen, also known as the hara, dantien or tan den. 

These lessons we will help you to organize a way of moving that is efficient, centered, powerful, and graceful, and reduces unnecessary tension throughout the body. We will deepen our awareness of, and clarify the function of the hip joints and spine, learning how the strength and support of our center can, and needs to be, involved in all our movement functions.  

We will also learn how to bring more intimacy and presence to the lower belly and pelvis as we participate in the nitty gritty our lives. 

For so many of us, our lower belly has suffered what Thomas Hanna called “sensory motor amnesia,” it is just a vague, absence of sensation “down there.” Often we have met our bellies with strong resistance- wanting them bellies to be stronger or smaller, but rarely have we entered this area with curiosity and receptivity.

People will often refer to “using the core,” but that usually means just tensing the whole region, and tension reduces sensitivity and skillful function. We want to have a belly that is strong, dynamic and supportive when needed and then fully relaxed, receptive to breath and to life.

There are over 100 million neurons in the gut, referred to as the enteric brain, we can learn to open to the intelligence that shines through this region. We can learn to trust out gut sense.

In many ways the hara is the gateway to embodied presence- just like the stillness that is present as you drop down beneath the waves of a turbulent ocean, the hara gives us a still, steady refuge that exists beneath the waves of thinking and activity in the world.

Bringing presence to this area can have a positive impact on just about everything in life- walking, running, yoga, meditating, having a difficult conversation, reading Trump headlines….there is a reason why the Chinese translation for this region is “field of nectar.”

Embodying The Masculine 2016

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